Technical: Linux – Redhat/CentOS – Add Gnome Desktop

Technical: Linux – Redhat/CentOS – Add Gnome Desktop

Occasionally one ends up with a bare terminal mode Redhat/CentOS Install.  But, if you prefer nice GUI, ala Microsoft Windows, all is not lost.

How to add Gnome to a CentOS 6 minimal install
http://www.jbmurphy.com/2011/12/01/how-to-add-gnome-to-centos-6-minimal-install/


yum groupinstall "Desktop" "Desktop Platform" "X Window System" "Fonts"

and, to start the GUI, run “sudo startx”.

Prior to finding jbmurphy.com, I had tried:


Post Install GUI:

http://forums.pcper.com/showthread.php?429669-POST-Install-GUI-(CENTOS)

which states to:

  • use yum groupinstall  to install “X Window System” / “Gnome Desktop Environment”
  • And, ran startx
yum groupinstall "X Window System" "GNOME Desktop Environment"

and, tried starting a GUI via:


sudo startx

but, failed to notice the warning message on the groupinstall “Gnome Desktop Environment”, that clearly stated:


Warning: Group Gnome Desktop Environment does not exist.

And, so upon issuing startx I ended up getting a very in-descriptive error message:


module fbcon not found

It seems CentOS 6.3 changed the names of Yum group names.

And, I wished I could say that is all the fun to be had.  But, no upon re-starting up my poor system, the system returned to poor terminal screen.  Yes, most of my work will be from the command line.  But, not everyone that will be using this system are so conversant with a Unix command line.

So how to auto-start in GUI.

Goggled till I bled.

Saw a lot of help, but the easiest for me to quickly surmise as being good; based on prettiness and thus easy accessibility is:

Configuring CentOS Runlevels and Services
http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Configuring_CentOS_Runlevels_and_Services

The key lines that did it for me says to check the /etc/inittab file and look for the un-commented entry:

id:3:initdefault:

This tells the init process that the default run level for the system is runlevel 3. To change to a different run level simply change the number to the desired runlevel and save the /etc/inittab file.

Earlier statements in same document had listed what the various runlevels mean:

  • Runlevel 3 – Similar to runlevel 2 except that networking services are started. This is the most common runlevel for server based systems that do not require any kind of graphical desktop environment.
  • Runlevel 5 – Boots the system into a networked, multi-user state with X Window System capability. By default the graphical desktop environment will start at the end of the boot process. This is the most common run level for desktop or workstation use.

So with the above enough of a guidance, launched another terminal window and confirmed my current level:

runlevel

The runlevel came back as 3

knowing that runlevel 5 will take me to Nirvana, I went ahead and used vi to edit /etc/inittab:

  • commented out id:3
  • added id:5

 

#id:3:initdefault:
id:5:initdefault:

 

Forced to listen to Kid Rock sing “Picture” …. I wished I had a good girl with me; it sure beats spitting at this computer all evening.

Kid Rock – Picture featuring Sheryl Crow
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKFx0MMqb48

References:

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